Lerman Diagnostic Imaging

Call Us: 718-491-4545

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
Patient safety tips prior to the procedure
Because of the strong magnetic field used during the exam, certain conditions may prevent you from having a MR procedure. When scheduling your appointment and prior to your exam, please alert our staff and technologist to the following conditions that may apply to you. The radiology staff will let then let you know whether you can have the MRI exam and whether the exam needs to be modified for your particular condition.
Pacemaker, Pregnancy, Claustrophobia, History of kidney problems, Skin tattoos, Neurostimulators (TENS-unit), Implanted drug infusion device (i.e., insulin pump), Exposure of metal fragments to your eye, Artificial heart valves, Aneurysm clips, Cochlear implants, Metallic implants and prosthesis, Vascular stent or stent graft, History as a metal worker, Shrapnel or bullet wounds, Dorsal column stimulators, Allergy to iodine, or gadolinium, History of diabetes, Other conditions you believe to be relevant.
Other Tips
Please leave your valuables at home, including jewelry, to prevent it from being lost or stolen, for they have to be removed prior to entering the scan room. If you don’t want to change into a gown, please wear cotton clothing without any metal zippers, hooks, or buttons.
Please let us know if you need interpreting services, this can be arranged for you. Please bring a list of your current medications.
If you have claustrophobia, your doctor may prescribe an oral medication for you to take with you for your MRI appointment.
What can I expect before my MRI exam?
There is little preparation for an MRI exam. Take your daily medications as you normally would, unless instructed otherwise. There are few dietary restrictions for an MRI. For those exams, you will be notified of the requirements. Please arrive at least 30 minutes prior to your exam and check in with the receptionist. You will need to complete the MRI screening form. If your clothes have any metal fasteners or metallic design, you will be asked to change into a hospital gown. A locker will be supplied to secure your belongings. A technologist will verify your identification and the requested exam. Your screening form will be reviewed by the technologist in consultation with the radiologist if indicated. If MRI contrast is indicated for the exam, an IV catheter will be inserted in your arm by a technologist.
What can I expect during my MRI scan?
The duration of the procedure will vary but the average is 30 minutes to one hour per body part. You will be required to lie still during the actual MR scanning. Depending on the body part that is being examined, you may be instructed to hold your breath for up to 30 seconds. The magnet is permanently open on both ends. It is well lit and there is a fan for patient comfort. There is also a two way intercom system for communication between patient and technologist. The part of the body being scanned will be placed in the middle of the magnet. During the actual imaging, you will hear a loud intermittent banging noise. You will be provided with earplugs or head phones to minimize the noise during the procedure.  The technologist will also provide you with an alarm button to alert the technologist of any discomfort you may experience at any point during the MRI exam. Some MRI exams require an injection of intravenous MRI contrast. Inform the technologist if you experience any discomfort during the injection.
What can I expect after my MRI scan?
If a dye injection is used, the IV is removed from the arm before you go home. Allergic reaction from gadolinium dye is extremely rare. However, if you experience symptoms such as rash, hives, or shortness of breath, you should notify the technologist immediately if you are still at the imaging facility, or call your doctor or go to the nearest hospital if you have already left the imaging facility. In the event that sedation is needed (such as for claustrophobia), you will be sent home once awake and alert. If you receive sedation, someone must drive you home.


CT scan
What can I expect before my CT scan?

You will be asked to remove any metallic or other items and ALL jewelry that might interfere with the scan.
What can I expect during my CT scan?
Your CT scan takes about 15 minutes, during which you will be lying on a padded table. You may be asked to lie on your stomach, back or side, and to hold your breath or stay very still. You may hear humming noises or feel the table move slowly through the CT scanner.
What can I expect after my CT scan?
After your CT scan, you should drink about five glasses of water to help flush out the contrast that was injected. If the area where the plastic tube (IV tube) was placed inside your vein is red, swollen or sore, you should put a warm, wet towel on the area four times a day for 15-20 minutes. If swelling continues for more than 48 hours, you should call your doctor. If you are breastfeeding, it is safe to continue to do so. 


PET/CT scan
Positron emission tomography, also called PET imaging or a PET scan, is a diagnostic examination that involves getting images of the body based on the detection of radiation from the emission of positrons. Positrons are tiny particles emitted from a radioactive substance administered to the patient.
Patient Safety Tips Prior to the Exam
Please let us know if you have any allergies or adverse reactions to medications. If you are pregnant or may be pregnant, please tell your doctor or technologist. Please leave your valuables at home. Bring a list of your current medications with you.
Preparation for the Procedure
You will be asked to follow the Limited Carbohydrate diet for the previous 24 hours before the date of your appointment. Do not eat or drink anything, except water, for 6 hours before the exam. You may drink water, as much water as you can would be helpful, until arrival.
Routine medications may be taken, unless you have been instructed otherwise. If you are diabetic, you may take your diabetes medication no less than 4 hours prior to the exam. Arrive 15-30 minutes before your PET scan. The technologist will verify your identification and exam requested. You will be given a contrast screening form to complete. In certain situations, the doctor may order lab tests prior to contrast being given. Commonly, contrast is injected into a vein to better define the images throughout the body. If the radiologist believes this is helpful, a small intravenous (IV) line is placed in an arm vein. Through this line, the contrast and the isotope will be injected. The contrast will be excreted through your kidneys.
During the Exam
The duration of the exam will vary, but the average is about 2 hours. The technologist will position you on the exam table, and give you instructions to remain still or to hold your breath. You will have the opportunity to ask the technologists questions. 
After the Procedure
You should drink about 5 glasses of water. Nursing mothers should wait for 24 hours before resuming breast-feeding. If you feel any symptoms such as nasal congestion, itchy eyes, hives, rashes, sneezing, restlessness, tremors, pain, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, please notify the staff immediately. The staff is prepared to handle these situations. If you feel any of these symptoms after you have left the department, please contact your doctor or go to the nearest emergency room. If your symptoms are life threatening, call 911.


Ultrasound (Sonography)
Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography, involves exposing part of the body to high-frequency sound waves to produce pictures of the inside of the body.
Patient Safety Tips Prior to a Diagnostic Exam in Radiology
Please let us know if you have any allergies or adverse reactions to medications. Please leave your valuables at home. 
Preparation for the Exam
The technologist will verify your identification and exam requested. The preparation for this test will depend on the type of ultrasound procedure your doctor has ordered. Some preparations include drinking a quart of water before the test to obtain better images. Your doctor will instruct you. Your doctor will instruct you.
During the Exam
The duration of the exam will vary, but the average is about 30-60 minutes. The technologist will position you on the exam table, and give you instructions. You will have the opportunity to ask the technologists questions. A small amount of water-soluble gel is applied to the skin over the area to be examined. A hand-held instrument is placed against the gel on your body. This instrument will be moved across the area being examined.
After the Exam
You may resume normal activities.


Mammography(Radiology Info Website)


Diagnostic X-Ray
An x-ray involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging.
Patient Safety Tips Prior to a diagnostic exam in Radiology
If you are pregnant or may be pregnant, please tell your doctor or technologist. Please leave your valuables at home or in your room in the hospital. Please arrive at least 30 minutes prior to your appointment.
Preparation for the exam
There are no special preparations for a diagnostic X-Ray exam. The technologist will verify your identification and exam requested.
During the exam
The duration of the exam will vary, but the average is about 15 minutes. The technologist will position you on the exam table, and give you instructions. You will have the opportunity to ask the technologists questions.
After the exam
You may resume normal activities.